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Welcome to Music Therapy Associates!

Our mission: To use music to help our clients attain goals, cope with hardship, overcome physical and mental challenges, and improve their quality of life.

What's New:

7 Ways Music Benefits your Heart, Brain & Health 

Who doesn’t love music? Certainly there are some of us, but for the most part music is a big part of our lives. Whether it’s the music that we listen to on the way to work, while we workout, or the music we hear in a symphony or film, it can bring up our moods, tell us a story or even bring us down. Music has touched cultures all over the world since very early times in human history. Have you ever wondered how music might affect our health?

“I think music in itself is healing. It’s an explosive expression of humanity. It’s something we are all touched by. No matter what culture we’re from, everyone loves music.” ~ Billy Joel

Personally I like many types of music, but I can’t say that I fall in love with a lot of music. It is usually special bands here and there that make their way through my ears that I tend to love and stick with for a long time. The beautiful thing is, everyone’s taste in music is different so no matter what music you make, you’re likely to find someone who will appreciate it. Of course the music industry favours certain types of music and is designed to not allow indie bands to get very far, but that is a whole other discussion. 

Music is capable of a number of health benefits including lowering stress levels, raising states of consciousness, changing moods, accessing...READ MORE

How Singing Can Help Parkinson's Patients 

Members of the P.E.I. Chapter of Parkinson Canada are participating in two hour-long sessions called Singing with Parkinson's. It's being offered through the Confederation Centre of the Arts by Toronto actress Paula Wolfson. 

Wolfson participated in research through Ryerson University that highlighted the benefits of singing to alleviate the symptoms of Parkinson's. She is starting a non-profit organization to help people across Canada.

"We're not a choir, it's not about what we sound like, it's about how we sing together and what we take from that," said Wolfson. READ MORE

Research shows taking music lessons can speed up brain development in children 

Music training has been found to be related to better language and mathematical skills, higher IQ, and overall greater academic achievement. Also, differences between musicians and non-musicians have been found in areas of the brain related to hearing and movement, among others. 

However, the interpretation of the findings remains unclear. For example, the differences reported between adult musicians and non-musicians might be due to long-term intensive training or might result primarily from inherent biological factors, such as genetic makeup. 

Or, as with many aspects of the nature-versus-nurture debate, the differences could well result from contributions of both environmental and biological factors. 

One way to better understand the effects of music training on child development would be to study children before they start any music training and... READ MORE

Mothers and Infants Bond Through Songs 

As one of the first records of human music, infant-directed singing permeates cultural boundaries and parenting traditions. Unlike other forms of caregiving, the act of mothers singing to infants is a universal behavior that seemingly withstands the test of time. 

On the surface, the exchange between mother and child may seem standard, but to Shannon de l'Etoile, professor of Music Therapy and associate dean of Graduate Studies at the University of Miami Frost School of Music, there is much more to the infant-directed song than meets the eye--and ear. 

"We know from previous research that infants have the innate ability to"... READ MORE

Therapist Spotlight

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Mary Cate Carr, MT-BC

Mary Cate first became interested in music therapy after her aunt suggested it as a possible career opportunity due to her love of music and passion for helping others. After looking into it and deciding that it seemed like a perfect fit, Mary Cate attended Temple University, where she graduated with a Bachelor's in Music Therapy, and went on to complete her clinical internship at Rebecca School in New York City, NY working with children and young adults diagnosed with ASD and other neurological disorders. 

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Mary Cate plays piano, guitar, ukulele and sings, and enjoys all genres of music, but especially 60s - 70s rock. In addition to her work with MTA, Mary Cate teaches private lessons on voice, piano and guitar, and some of her favorite passtimes include hiking, traveling, and trying different foods.

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